Maxwell Parrish

January 12, 2011

Maxwell Parrish was born in Philadelphia on July 25, 1870. He started his art career during the golden age of illustration, which was when he began drawing for the entertaiment. During his early years he enjoyed drawing black and white pictures,  in which he would add a disctinctive blue pigment  into the shadows and other significant  areas. This color of blue was later named Parrish Blue, due to his discovery of the shade. The movement he joined in was seen as classical romantic, where he used soft natural lines and movement in his paintings. He began to do illustrations and paintings for fairytale books such as “Sleeping Beauty”, “Cinderella”,”Snow White”, and so forth. Around 1900 he began climbing in his career. he started to illustate in popular mazagines and books, he began being very well-known for his impressive ability to create such strong  and interesting paintings . His artwork became famous for the bright imaginative colors and the beauty he brought into the pictures. After the romantic classical style became less unfashionable in the 1930’s he began to paint landscape style. Parrish continued to take pleasure in painting until he was 90 years old, He died on March 30, 1966  at the age of 96. Now, after his work and dedication to paintings and beauty, every person who sees his work can discover his beautiful world of illustrations.

by Laura

By JAMEY KEATEN

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Slideshow: Found Picasso artwork (on this page)
PARIS — A retired French electrician and his wife have come forward with 271 undocumented, never-before-seen works by Pablo Picasso estimated to be worth at least €60 million ($79.35 million), an administrator of the artist’s estate said Monday.

The couple for years squirreled away the staggering trove — which is believed to be authentic, but whose origin is unclear — in their garage on the French Riviera, said Picasso Administration lawyer Jean-Jacques Neuer.

The cache, dating from the artist’s most creative period from 1900 to 1932, includes lithographs, portraits, watercolors, and sketches — plus nine Cubist collages said to be worth €40 million alone, according to French daily Liberation, which first reported Monday on the discovery.

Pierre Le Guennec, a 71-year-old former electrician who once worked for Picasso, and his wife showed many of the works to Picasso’s son Claude and other estate administrators in Paris in September seeking to have the works certified as authentic, the lawyer said.

Shortly after that meeting, Neuer filed suit on behalf of Picasso’s heirs for alleged illegal receipt of the works — and police investigators are looking into how Le Guennec and his wife came by the pictures.

The couple said that they were given the works by Picasso and his wife, Jacqueline, according to a police official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the investigation is under way.

Claude Picasso, quoted in Liberation, noted that his father was known for his generosity — but that he always dedicated, dated and signed his gifts, as he knew that some recipients might try to sell the works one day.

“To give away such a large quantity, that’s unheard-of. It doesn’t hold water,” Claude Picasso was quoted in Liberation as saying. “This was part of his life.”

To some, the emergence of the works by the 20th century’s most renowned artist is akin to opening a time capsule, or a discovery on par with the recent publication of Mark Twain’s 100-year-dormant autobiography.

“Claude Picasso was astounded. He couldn’t believe his eyes,” said Neuer. “Just about everybody has felt that way … when you have 271 Picasso works that were never seen, never inventoried — that’s just unprecedented.”

New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art says Picasso produced more than 20,000 works of art during his long career. Hundreds have been listed as missing — a number so large in part because he was so prolific.

The AP attempted to reach Le Guennec by phone, but no one answered. Liberation said the former electrician claimed to have worked at three of Picasso’s residences — and once installed a security alarm system for the artist.

~Posted by Sally, even though i didn’t write it! 😛

 

Known as one of the most significant movements in the history of Art, Impressionism first appeared in the 19th century. In the beginning, Impressionism was looked upon negatively because it was out of the “norm”. It provided a new look at the world focusing mostly on scenes such as landscapes and everyday life. Adding to the oddness of this type of painting, artists would paint in front of their scenes, witnessing them exactly as they were; painting their “first impression”. Before this time, painters would paint “studio” or indoors. Painting outside seemed very unusual. Impressionist painters loved playing with lighting, the mixture of colors and use of diverse brush strokes.

During this time an artist by the name of Claude Monet stood out as he defined Impressionism in his own way. He spent most of his life painting his favorite landscapes along with numerous subjects of his choice. Most of his works play with reflections on water, or the shadows he found in his scenes such as his painting La Grenouillere, (1869). In this painting Monet and Pierre Auguste Renoir discovered that shadows weren’t only black or brown, but they were colored based off of the things surrounding them.

He discovered other things about painting such as using some objects to focus on the subject of the painting allowing it to stand out more. The painting Water Lilies, (1915), shows how he used water and reflection to add to the flowers, making them the subject of the painting. In his later years he devoted his time painting scenes such as Water Lilies, showing his love for gardening and small bodies of water (lakes, ponds, etc.). It was in his last years that he created the paintings that he is mainly remembered by. Monet is one of the many artists that contributed to the Impressionist movement, but he tends to stand out more then others. When the word Impressionism is brought up, one of the first names that come to mind is Claude Monet.


by Andrea

M.C. Escher

November 5, 2010

Maurits Cornelis Escher was born in the Netherlands on June 17, 1898.  He attended the Haarlem School of Architecture and Decorative Arts between the years 1919 and 1922, where he learned to make woodcuts. When Escher left the school, he travelled through Italy, and it was there that he met his wife, Jetta Umiker. He lived in Rome for a time, then moved to Switzerland, then to Belgium, then back to the Netherlands. He lived there until his death in 1972. Most of his better known pieces were done between the years 1941 and 1972. Escher usually worked with woodcuts and lithographs in creating his art pieces.

He is known for his portrayal of geometric relationships, and he used black and white to enhance dimensions in his creations. Ecsher played with impossible realities, books on a table turn into buildings on a street, as in Still Life and Street (1937):

Escher explored the idea of infinity in his works such as The Ants (1963) in which the ants are crawling in an endless cycle and we can’t tell where the line of ants begins and ends:

 

M.C. Escher also did many tesselations, which is the filling in of a plane with shapes in a pattern to make so there are no gaps or spaces between the shapes:

 

Escher’s use of mathematical and geometric relationships, symmetry and infinity, and distortion of perspective have made him one of the most recognizable artists of the modern art.

 

 

 

by Klarissa

Johannes Vermeer’s painting of the “Girl With the Pearl Earring” is considered to be one of his best masterpieces. What I find most interesting about this painting is the lighting and how it directs the viewer’s eyes to the pearl on her ear. When I first look at this painting, I notice her eyes. They are bright and looking directly at you. Afterwards, I notice her entire face, including her facial expression and then her earring. Her earring is the focal point and the lighting is what helps the viewer find it. The expression the girl has on her face is interesting because it looks as though she was caught off guard, like when someone with a camera says your name, you turn around and they take a picture. Was that Vermeer’s intention to make it look like that when he painted this picture? For me, this painting creates a mysterious atmosphere because I begin to think of questions like, who is she? What is she doing? What is the purpose of this? I also think this picture sets a peaceful mood because it is very beautiful and the colors on the girl are soft. There are different interpretations to gather from this painting but, I don’t think there is a right or wrong interpretation for art.

 

By Erin

~*Golden Childhood*~

November 4, 2010

              Donald Zolan grew up in Brookfeild, Illinois with a family full of very talented artists and so he began painting at age three. At the age of five he was already winning art competitions and won his first major art competition at age thirteen. This award was a scholarship to the prestigious Art Institute of Chicago where he developed many skills. Not even three years he was granted a scholarship to Chicago’s American Academy of Art. After much exploration of his possibility he decided to open his own gallery in Nantucket. He has become known as America’s Premier Childrens Artist; he has won twenty two awards for his amazing abilities. In his own words Zolan epresses his love of children,”I love children, the way their eyes light up with excitement as they awaken to the world around them. Its a marvelous time of life,  filled with wonderment. A time when each new discovery is another magical moment.” Because he lived such a wonderful childhood he is able to reflect the emotions he felt as a young child venturing his journey through the world.

An Enchanting Flame

This painting reminds me of a truly golden childhood memory. The emotion on the little girl's face is so captivating and draws you to the flame. Donald Zolan has captured the child's facial expression perfectly; we begin to see into her mind. She is fascinated, curious, perplexed, and transfixed with the miraculous thing happening before her. Like a hot air balloon which requires hot air to function, these candlesticks are making the figures spin in a circular motion. In this painting the fixed point is the fire, the first thing that I saw when looking at this painting was the girl but then her gaze directed me towards the flame. With the painting i can imagine she has been staring at the flame for a while. This was an attractive painting to me because it reminds me of my childhood which seem to be my 'happier days' and it brings a smile to my face with the memories flooding in. The colors are very warm and draw alot of attention to the flame, there is one direct swift movement towards this enchanting flame because of all the color surrounding it. Zolan is a brilliant artist because he is so detailed with every little brushstroke and he puts invention into the picture adding story to it. I like this painting particularly because I understand what the girl is thinking because I was there once; it relates to me.

An Enchanting Flame

This painting reminds me of a truly golden childhood memory. The emotion on the little girl’s face is so captivating and draws you to the flame. Donald Zolan has captured the child’s facial expression perfectly; we begin to see into her mind. She is fascinated, curious, perplexed, and transfixed with the miraculous thing happening before her. Like a hot air balloon which requires hot air to function, these candlesticks are making the figures spin in a circular motion. In this painting the fixed point is the fire, the first thing that I saw when looking at this painting was the girl but then her gaze directed me towards the flame. With the painting i can imagine she has been staring at the flame for a while. This was an attractive painting to me because it reminds me of my childhood which seem to be my ‘happier days’ and it brings a smile to my face with the memories flooding in. The colors are very warm and draw alot of attention to the flame, there is one direct swift movement towards this enchanting flame because of all the color surrounding it. Zolan is a brilliant artist because he is so detailed with every little brushstroke and he puts invention into the picture adding story to it. I like this painting particularly because I understand what the girl is thinking because I was there once; it relates to me.

Smelling A flower

Another thing that he incorporates into his work is his use of paintings. He selects colors that flow very well together that add an energetic bouncy feeling to the painting. The painting has a delicateness about it because it shows the child's wonderful innocence.

Smelling A Flower

Another thing that he incorporates into his work is his use of color. He selects colors that flow very well together that add an energetic bouncy feeling to the painting. The painting has a  delicateness about it because it shows the child’s wonderful innocence.

by Ellen Timpson

1910

Wassily Kandinsky is well known for trying to create art that you would experience as you would music. Perhaps that is why I’ve always been so mesmerized by his bold, fluid, colorful paintings.  Even as a child he was deeply stimulated by certain colors, and attached meaning and emotion to each. I think I was attracted to this painting in particular because of the figures. They seem childish in the sense that they are defined similar to a coloring book character, without being filled in. This is interesting because it makes the color remain as the dominant subject in the painting. Even the definition between how he painted the colors seems to have meaning. The dominating blue section has various directions of brush strokes and shades of blue while the reds and yellows seem to be more blocky and defined. I also noticed that the warm tones are underneath the figures in the lower left hand corner, and the larger figures on the right hand side seem to be turning away from them.

            This painting in particular is very compelling to me, but because this painting is so abstract, the details I get meaning from may be far fetched from what Kandinsky was thinking when he painted it. As an intensely deep thinker, he would develop his ideas theoretically before he ever began composing. The abstraction found in his paintings is very precise, as he believed it left certain purity to the concept of the painting. Initially, I was drawn to this painting simply because of the fact that he was improvising. That takes his ability to produce a painting in its purest form to a whole new level. Although I love that he thought through his artworks so deeply, it’s intriguing that this just came to him. In a way perhaps it would have provided him with a chance to step back and see what he ideas he was able to develop on a less deliberate level, with a little more room for interpretation.

by Kiersten

 

Much of the art from ancient Greece appeared on their vases. The subjects shown most often in any Greek paintings were their gods and myths. The Greeks told stories of their gods and the myths of their great successes through their art. An example of this is the story of the Odyssey. In many of the Greek vases it shows various scenes from the Odyssey.

Here are two examples of scenes from the Odyssey. The first one shows the scene when Odysseus escapes the cyclops Polyphemus by hiding on the bellies of the cyclops’ sheep. The second painting shows the scene where Odysseus hears the song of the sirens and is struggling to go to their music, but cannot because he tied himself to the mast. The heroic story is told through their art. Both of these paintings are shown similar to that of the Egyptian style, they are very rigid and orderly. This was before the Greeks began exploring and bending the rules of art, so the rules of the painting were very strict.

by Esther

Paul & Jean de Limbourg

October 19, 2010

The first in the illustrated calander business?


Book of Hours

The Limbourg brothers flattered the Duke of Berry (ca. 1410) with this extensive and elaborate illustrated manuscript.  Among other things, the book includes an illustrated calander in which, month by month, the Duke was shown enjoying the high life in a manner apporopiate for that particular season.  The Limbourgs used only the finest brushes and most expensive paint pigments (hence the deep blue) to further flaunt the Duke’s “endless” wealth.

Imagine a calander in your kitchen in which the months are paired up with original Vincent van Gogh paintings!

by Charles